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Making the Bhagavad Gita Work for You

After years of yoga, retreats and sessions with spiritual teachers, I was finally motivated to read the Bhagavad Gita, one of the oldest and most relevant Hindu texts ever written. Religious reading is hard. It is slow. It can even, at times, be boring.  But the Bhagavad Gita is an action-packed tale that gets to the point […]

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A Young Adult Novel Written Entirely in Verse

I recently visited the main branch of the Miami Public Library System and was strongly impressed by what I found. Although the entire library was elegant, spacious, well-stocked and easy to decipher, the teen’s section was truly remarkable. There were large signs indicating that only 12-19 year-olds were allowed to use the area, which was equipped with […]

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Go Medieval on Your Verse

One of my favorite blogs is called “Interesting Literature.” It is just that, a site with interesting, often very random, facts about literature and literary history. A few weeks ago they published a piece called “10 Short Medieval Poems Everyone Should Read.” Fear not. The poems included  are only a few lines long and translation is provided, […]

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Those White Cliffs of Dover

Last week, I wrote about a poem written by Randall Mann titled “Bernal Hill.” A discerning reader pointed at the near-obvious reference Mann’s poem makes to the classic “Dover Beach,” written in the mid-1800’s by English poet Matthew Arnold. I accept that the reference totally slipped my grasp, so I wanted to share Arnold’s poem this week. “Dover […]

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Light and Classic

I walked into the amazing and incredible Shakespeare & Co on Lexington Avenue today and asked for the lightest (both physically and intellectually) classic novel they sold. A young assistant rightly suggested “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” by Truman Capote. He said he had just read it and it made him feel “late to the party.” I […]

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