Essays.

Woodshop: Where I Live and Work

I have to admit I am thrilled that CutBank Literary Magazine published my piece in their “Woodshop” series. The series is dedicated to showing where various writers live and work. So, this means they consider me a “writer.” Thrilling. CutBank has been around for 40 years as Montana’s foremost literary magazine. The poetry and other […]

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Opposites Attract: How Romanticism and Utilitarianism Opened the Door for Darwin’s Natural Selection

Charles Darwin changed the way the world thinks. Even those that disagree with his ideas must in the end answer to them and struggle to defend beliefs that uphold wand-like creation. Darwin’s creation, instead, is slow, gradual, painstaking, but revolutionary. The very nature of his theory of evolution made it contentious to present. Fortunately, by […]

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From Kant to Marx: A Brief & Easy History of Philosophy

If German philosopher Immanuel Kant was anything, it was optimistic. Even though he quickly recognized the potential risks of the 18th century political and intellectual awakening known as the “Enlightenment,” he focused on the positive and worked to steer the movement along a middle philosophical course, away from potentially explosive extremes. Examples of such extremes […]

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No Wrong Questions

Last night I went to a lecture on the moral limits of a market economy presented by Michael Sandel, which was part of the Hay Festival in Cartagena. Professor Sandel teaches one of the most popular courses at Harvard University. It’s called “Justice” and it’s about how to decide what is right and what is […]

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